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The OIE provides Africa with 18 million doses of vaccine against avian influenza virus H5N1

19 February 2007 90 years of solidarity

Help the countries protect their poultry against the H5N1 avian influenza virus strain, by supplying vaccines for poultry populations at risk.
© A.Davey on flickR, original name : Poultry

Back in February 2007: the OIE supplied Africa with vaccines for three months through its regional avian influenza vaccine bank to help countries to protect their poultry and prevent transmission to humans. 

This vaccine delivery was the result of a partnership between the OIE and the African Union Interafrican Bureau for Animal Resources (AU/IBAR), supported by the European Union. It enabled rapid assistance to be given to several countries to help them protect their poultry against the H5N1 avian influenza virus strain, by supplying vaccines for poultry populations at risk, as well as helping to provide uninfected countries with a strategic stockpile of vaccines to safeguard themselves. 

Between December 2006 and February 2007, the OIE delivered 18 million doses of avian influenza vaccine:

  • Egypt: 14 million doses
  • Mali: 1 million doses
  • Mauritania: 2 million doses
  • Senegal: 1 million doses

For a reminder

In 2007, alongside this regional vaccine bank, the OIE also established a global avian influenza vaccine bank, funded by the Canadian International Development Agency.

Under the European Commission-funded Regional Cooperation Programme on Highly Pathogenic Emerging and Re-emerging Diseases (HPED) in Asia, this vaccine bank has been extended to Asia and includes vaccines for other diseases (foot and mouth disease and rabies). 

Read more

Vaccinating poultry against avian influenza to reduce economic losses

Since 2004, the OIE, the WHO and the FAO have been working on a common strategy to promote the targeted vaccination of poultry at risk of being infected by the HPAI virus
© European Commission  DG ECHO on flickR, original name : Darfurians refugees in Eastern Chad

This solidarity programme to vaccinate poultry at risk formed part of a broader global strategy to contain the spread of the epizootic. To this end, the OIE, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) have been working since 2004 on a common strategy to promote the targeted vaccination of poultry at risk of being infected by the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, in order to contain spread of the epizootic in affected countries unable to apply stamping-out measures in outbreaks. 

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FAO/OIE/WHO Technical Consultation on the Control of Avian Influenza

In April 2005, OIE and FAO went on to launch a joint network of expertise on avian influenza (OFFLU). In 2009, OFFLU was extended to include all animal influenzas. Its objective is to provide continuously updated scientific data to support Veterinary Services in their efforts to reduce the risks associated with animal influenza viruses and so protect both animal and public health.
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Avian influenza: a highly contagious viral disease

Avian influenza, is an animal disease that can infect several species of food-producing birds, as well as pet birds and wild birds.
© Erik Cleves Kristensen on flickR, original name : Chickens at poultry farm

Avian influenza, caused by the Type A influenza virus, is an animal disease that can infect several species of food-producing birds (including chickens, turkeys, quail and guinea fowl), as well as pet birds and wild birds. The virus has also been isolated from a number of mammal species, including humans.

There are several strains of avian influenza virus, generally divided into two groups according to their ability to cause disease (pathogenicity): low pathogenic strains (LPAI) that typically cause few or no clinical signs in birds and highly pathogenic strains (HPAI) that cause severe clinical signs and often result in high mortality rates.

H5N1, a high-surveillance strain

Over the past decade, major outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 have occurred in both domestic and wild birds. The first outbreaks occurred in South-East Asia in 2003, before spreading to Africa, Europe and the Middle East.

This strain is kept under close watch because of its extreme virulence not only in poultry but also in wild birds, coupled with its ability to spread to mammals. It has also caused human cases, although avian influenza viruses are mostly confined to animals.

Avian influenza is a disease listed in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code (Terrestrial Code): Member Countries are obliged to report to the OIE any occurrence of the H5 or H7 strain on their territory. 

Read more about avian influenza

   

Avian influenza is a disease listed in the OIE Terrestrial Code: Member Countries are obliged to report to the OIE any occurrence of the H5 or H7 strain on their territory.

OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code(Chapter 10.4)

OIE Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals (Chapter 2.3.4)

Track the global status of avian influenza type H5 and H7

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